Date:

Author

Category: IT News, IT Support.

Close-up of stethoscope on laptop keyboard

We all know that computers often slow down over time, but why is this and what can you do about it?

  1. Remove unwanted software and stop programs running automatically on start-up

When your new shiny computer first arrives there is usually nothing on it except for the operating system (usually Windows) and consequently it boots up in seconds and runs faster than Usain Bolt.

What you may not realise is that a lot of software you load will automatically add at least some element to the start-up routine of the computer so as soon as you boot the computer up the software starts running. After a while there will be quite a few of these programs vying for attention on start-up and/or continuing to run background services whilst you go about your work, all slowing your computer down.

So check what these are (or get your IT support company to) and remove anything unwanted or unnecessary.

  1. Keep your disk tidy

Files and programs are written to your hard disk in the most efficient way to read them back, which usually means the information is stored together. However, over time your disk becomes full and so the data often gets written in different areas making it slow to read back. This is known as disk fragmentation. Luckily a disk defragmentation program can move these all around and put them back in an efficient structure again.

Disk fragmentation is typically not an issue on modern Windows operating systems as they perform background disk defragmentation during idle time. However, if the disk is very full, defragmentation may never actually finish so you should make sure you have plenty of free disk space and perform a manual defrag every so often (when you’re not using the computer) to ensure it has run properly.

  1. Upgrade your memory

Programs and their data are typically only partially loaded into memory, with the remainder staying in temporary (“swap”) space on the hard disk. The relevant part of the program or data then gets loaded into memory (Random Access Memory – RAM) as it’s required. Not only is this process slow but as your disk get filled up (see 2 above) it gets even slower.

The more RAM you have the less likely your computer will need to swap data from disk space so consider upgrading the size of your RAM; it could make a huge difference for very little investment.

  1. Upgrade your hard drive

Given how your computer uses its hard disk drive (see point 3 above), a slow drive means a slow computer so consider replacing your standard hard drive (that has lots of moving parts and spins like an old fashioned record) with a new Solid State Drive (SSD). SSD’s have no moving parts and so are incredibly fast and don’t wear out like traditional hard drives. They are more expensive than standard hard drives but if you save 30 minutes every day you could make the difference back in efficiency in weeks or even days!

  1. Is your anti-virus checker efficient and up to date?

Some anti-virus software can be very intensive and use quite a bit of your computing power. Unfortunately some users, in an attempt to speed up the computer, remove their antivirus and then get infected with malware. Some malware is stealthy and if you don’t have antivirus installed you may not notice it except as a general slowdown, thus having the exact opposite affect the user wanted.

Check with your IT support provider that you have efficient anti-virus software and that it is configured correctly to give you maximum protection without slowing your computer down. Never remove anti-virus software!

Finally, do remember that computers do actually wear out and become obsolete as the technology around them moves on. Any hardware that is over 3 years old is unlikely to perform at its best.

For example, as the average computer gets faster and web technology advances, browsers and sites become correspondingly more complex and therefore, on the same hardware, slower. Your computer may not be able to run the latest and most efficient versions of software due to incompatibility issues or your graphics card may not be able to handle the wonderful enhanced graphics now used by browsers and software.

If you’ve tried all of the above and your computer is still slow then perhaps it’s time to move on a buy a new one.

Date:

Author

Category: Cloud Computing, IT News, IT Support.

With all the recent chatter around SaaS based deployment for software systems, it’s easy to forget that many small and medium business still haven’t made the transition to the cloud. The recent report from Software Advice, the online resource for IT help desk software, showed this was the case with only 32% of SMEs having moved their service desk software to the cloud. To learn more about why these business haven’t moved to SaaS, I asked some questions of Craig Borowski, the Market Researcher who conducted this survey and wrote the report.

  • What are some of the driving reasons that are keeping this 68% of businesses off of the cloud for their help desk? This is a great question and it’s one we at Software Advice are very familiar with. In our discussions, two broad reasons come up often. The first is simply unfamiliarity with the cloud, either general unfamiliarity or else unfamiliarity with the growing selection of SaaS help desk platforms. The second reason could be described as something like a corporate cultural inertia. These are companies that are just generally resistant to change. They might have been using on-premise help desk systems for so long, the prospect of changing to a new deployment model seems too risky or too foreign.
  • What is the biggest reason people are going to the cloud? It’s tough to single out one biggest reason because they tend to vary by industry and by company size. However, quite often, the reasons boil down to companies wanting to spend more time and effort doing what they do best, their core competencies, and less time and effort doing all that’s necessary to keep an on-premise system running, up-to-date and secure.
  • Did you find a correlation with those more familiar with the cloud being more comfortable with using it? There is certainly a correlation. Companies that have no experience with cloud software are more apt to exhibit a ‘fear of the unknown’ when trying to evaluate cloud versus on-premise systems. They raise concerns about data security, about downtime, about losing control of their platform. Meanwhile, companies that have used other cloud-deployed software very rarely raise these concerns when evaluating cloud help desk software. It’s an interesting dynamic and we plan to look into it in much more detail in an upcoming survey.
  • Do you expect more businesses to shift to the cloud in the coming years? And why or why not? Absolutely. The shift to the cloud has been going on for many years, longer than many companies realize. Moving forward, we can expect that as more companies realize the benefits of cloud deployment— cost reduction, better scalability, flexibility, security etc.— others will continue to follow suit. It’s very difficult to imagine going back to the world where all software is hosted locally.
  • What would you advise a small business thinking about going to the cloud? For small businesses, cloud-based platforms can be an extremely viable choice. An easy way to illustrate this point is by simply turning the question around. Why are you looking for an on-premise system? Are your reasons valid and justifiable? With this line of questioning, it doesn’t take long for the small business to realize that one of the main benefits of cloud software is that it can free them from many of the things that on-premise deployments require.

 

Date:

Author

Category: Data Backup, IT News, IT Security, IT Support.

World-Backup-Day-Logo

What would you do if you lost everything?

That’s the question being posed on World Backup Day 2015; a global movement to emphasise the importance of keeping a second copy of all your important files.

For our customers, every day is World Backup Day – as you would expect when your IT is in the safe hands of an award-winning official Microsoft SME Cloud Partner.

But for those who don’t have this contingency strategy in place, this is a great opportunity to evaluate:

  • Which files are crucial to the successful continuity (and let’s face it – profitability) of your service provision?
  • What are you already doing about backing them up now, and
  • What should you be doing to minimise the irreversible damage that occurs when your hard drive fails?

If your data isn’t backed up, once it’s gone it’s gone, and losing your files is way more common than you’d think. One small accident or failure could destroy all the important information your business and livelihood depends on.

In fact, research has shown that 60% of companies that lose their data will shut down within six months of the disaster whilst 93% of companies that lost their data for 10 days or more due to a disaster filed for bankruptcy within one year of the disaster. (Source: National Archives & Records Administration).

The good news is backing up is straight-forward once you’ve set up the backup process. There are a number of different methods – depending on how you want to backup your data and how safe you want to keep it. It’s just a matter of taking the first step of recognising the value of your data.

For more information download our free leaflet on backup advice or fill in the contact form to find out how we can help you manage your backups.

Close-up of stethoscope on laptop keyboard

Date:

Author

Category: IT News, IT Support.

You may have read the news that Sony’s PlayStation online store was recently compromised.

It’s news that further illustrates just how important it is to protect data given how vulnerable it can be – even for massive corporations like Sony.

The company immediately said the problem had lasted only two hours and there was no sign of any damage, or more worryingly, data theft.

All of the data stored on our computers and electronic devices can be vulnerable if we are not careful, but there are a number of ways we can go about protecting our IT devices and more importantly – the information stored on them. Here are five of them.

Read more »

Windows 10 What You Need to Know

Date:

Author

Category: IT News, Latest.

At a rather low-key ceremony in San Francisco last week, Microsoft announced to the world the imminent release of its brand new and hotly-anticipated operating system.

Wait a minute, where’s Windows 9?” I hear you cry.

Okay, new software will be released in 2015, but Microsoft has decided to skip “Windows 9” and bizarrely shoot straight for Windows 10 instead (presumably because the number 10 sounds a lot more complete than 9 does – at least in theory).

So why the change of heart?

Well, the problem for Microsoft is that around 1.5 billion people use Windows in one form or another but very few use the platform on their phones, tablets and other mobile devices.

So, if anything, tweaking their already successful Windows OS could be more of an effort to move with the times than cornering a new fan base.

Some even see it as an attempt to win back the traditional PC user, who has been on the receiving end of some serious flirtation from the likes of Apple and Google in recent years.

On first impressions it would appear that, rather that adding a load of new and unnecessary features, the latest package has been designed with simplicity very much at the forefront in an attempt to seduce those lost to Microsoft’s previous incarnation.

So what else can we expect from a company that is so keen to move on from Windows 8?

Here’s what we can all look forward to when Windows 10 is released next year.

Read more »

How to avoid stolen smartphone

Date:

Author

Category: IT News, Mobile Computing.

A new Mobile Phone Theft report compiled by the Home Office has indicated that over 740,000 people were victims of phone theft over the last two years – with Apple handsets more likely to be stolen than any other phone.

In London alone, almost 100,000 mobile phones were reported stolen to the Metropolitan Police during the 12 months of 2013.

The report states that the iPhone 5, 5C, 5S and 4S were most targeted followed by the Blackberry 9790.

Apparently, 37% of mobile phone thefts took place on public transport or in another public place, with under a third taking place in bars, pubs and clubs. Surprisingly, nearly 20% of thefts occurred in places of work.

And as for those more likely to be the victim of mobile phone crime, the report suggests 4.7% of phone theft victims were women aged between 18-21, while 14-24 year olds are the targeted more than any other group – either stolen directly from their person, through pick-pocketing, or when the handset is briefly left unattended.

Read more »

Extend iPhone Battery Life

Date:

Author

Category: IT News, IT Support, Mobile Computing.

Unless you’re still using that faithful old Nokia 3210 you’ve had since the turn of the millennium, you probably find yourself constantly checking the battery life of your iPhone to make sure you’re not stuck on a desolate hillside in the middle of nowhere without being able call for help or (more importantly) left out of social plans, unable to see what your friends are up to or play Candy Crush Saga.

Battery drain for smartphone users isn’t a new phenomenon but since the launch of Apple’s iOS 7.1 mobile operating system iPhone users in particular have complained about dwindling battery life.

But according to former Apple Genius Bar worker Scotty Loveless, it’s not necessarily iOS itself that is causing batteries to drain quickly – but all the Apps that are running on it.

So does this mean we need to change the way we all use our phones and access the Apps we value so dearly or simply change our phones full-stop?

Here are nine tips you can try that might just increase the battery life of your smartphone:

Read more »

Spam Emails

Date:

Author

Category: Data Backup, IT News, IT Security.

New research suggests that cyber-crime costs small businesses around £800 million a year.

Not only that, but you have a responsibility to put adequate measures in place – if not, you could face fines of as much as £500,000 for cyber breach and data loss under current legislation. Other threats include: social media misuse, hacking, and loss of company devices.

As many as 60 per cent of small firms reported security issues last year, with major breaches costing a small firm on average between £65,000 and £115,000.

Here, we’ve created a useful checklist to help you assess whether you are helping reduce the chances of the worst happening to your business.

How many of the following questions can you answer “YES” to?

Read more »

Facebook Work Version

Date:

Author

Category: IT News, Latest.

There’s no doubt social media can be a valuable tool when it comes to developing workplace connections, discussing the latest industry news or even finding a new job.

Although, many will argue that LinkedIn is setup to do exactly that.

However, not wanting to miss out on this particular niche, Facebook is planning to build its very own “at work” website that will go head-to-head with LinkedIn as the professional’s choice of social network.

An unnamed source at the company has claimed it is working on a new version for use during working hours. Sky News reported the anonymous individual as saying: “We are making work more fun and efficient by building an at-work version of Facebook.”

Read more »