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Category: IT Security.

The PC Support Group has discovered a potentially serious problem with version 8.5.322 of the AVG Anti-virus software. It may partially uninstall itself leaving the computer exposed to potential viruses.

Although reported in some other parts of the world it would appear that The PC Support Group was the first company to discover and report the problem in the UK.

Users are typically noticing the problem when they open MS Outlook and get a message relating to the ‘AVG Exchange add in’ being removed or unavailable although they can check by seeing if the AVG icon is still visible (usually on the bottom right of the screen).

The PC Support Group has worked with AVG to understand the problem and ensure its customers are updated with version 8.5.323 which overcomes this issue.

We take the security of our customer’s systems very seriously and it’s one of the reasons that we recommend AVG as over the last few years it has regularly come out as one of the top rated anti-virus packages available. We were therefore very surprised to discover this problem.

AVG responded quickly and a fixed version is already available. Within hours of the discovery we had upgraded most of our customers and the remainder will be completed very shortly.

Business users not supported by The PC Support Group should go to AVG web site, click on Support, choose the Downloads tab and then select the appropriate version to download and run. Then select the ‘Repair’ option and follow the prompts.

If you’re in any doubt then contact your IT support provider who should be able to advise you.

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Category: IT Security.

In this ever increasingly cost concious environment it’s worth remembering that one area that small businesses must not neglect is IT security.

Updating anti-virus software, using encrypted technology and protecting confidential information are all vital as criminals and fraudsters look to take advantage of economic confusion and anxiety to target businesses and home users.

Recent research from the Department for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform shows that the average cost of a severe breach of security for small businesses is between £10,000 and £20,000. If news of such breaches leaks out, the damage to the reputation of the business could cost much more.

The PC Support Group has also noticed an increasing trend for potential customers to check whether a firm has suitable technology and policies in place to protect against possible data loss, so taking responsible security measures could also help you win business!

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Category: IT Security.

With the economy shrinking rapidly most small businesses are looking to make savings and at least retain the business they have.

Unfortunately we all know where major savings can be made – reducing labour costs through redundancy. This is never easy for a business and it’s even harder on those on the receiving end of a P45.

One consequence of this of which all businesses need to be aware is that disgruntled employees may use security holes to take revenge. With more businesses having to take these drastic actions, Microsoft has recently warned that such malicious attacks are likely to increase.

A study last year by Verizon in the US found that insider breaches accounted for 18% of attacks.

Small businesses in particular are renowned for their “easy going” approach to security with many businesses using the same user name and password for all employees or extremely simple passwords such as the user’s surname. Whilst the staff are happily employed and focused on their work this seems a non-issue but if they feel badly treated then such basic security can often give them the freedom to inflict a huge amount of damage.

While insider attacks are lower in number, they can be more devastating because employees know where “the juicy stuff” is kept – unlike hackers who have to search for a company’s valuable assets.

These problems are easily prevented but most companies simply don’t see this insider threat. Our advice is to make sure you take your security seriously. Use secure passwords (ideally a mixture of upper and lower case characters and numbers – at least 8 characters long), limit access to the systems that employees need, immediately remove such access as soon as an employee is made redundant or sacked, and make sure your internet connection is secure.